Types of Care

Palliative care is excellent care for people living with a serious illness. But other models, or types, of care exist that can complement palliative care. They can also be helpful and appropriate for you. Here are descriptions of types of care that have good reputations and proven results:

Community Aging in Place – Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE)

Community Aging in Place – Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) helps older adults remain at home. Based on financial need, this program helps people who have a hard time completing daily tasks, like taking a bath or cooking a meal. The CAPABLE care team includes a nurse, occupational therapist, and handyman. These helpers visit your home and take care of your individual needs. The CAPABLE team works closely with you to identify your goals. It keeps you feeling safe and secure in your own home. CAPABLE is currently available in nine states.

Who can benefit from CAPABLE?

  • Adults over 65 with disabilities
  • Frail older adults
  • People with multiple chronic conditions

Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE)

Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE) provides older adults with a support team. The team includes a nurse and social worker, who provide extra support for you, your caregiver(s), and your doctor. The team comes to your home to assess your condition. Then they develop an individualized care plan to address your individual needs. GRACE teams are currently available in six states.

Who can benefit from GRACE?

  • Frail older adults
  • People with multiple chronic conditions

Guided Care®

Guided Care® works with your primary doctor to provide an extra layer or support for older adults with chronic illnesses. This program revolves around the nurses of Guided Care®. The nurses visit you in your home, and work with your primary doctors to determine your needs. Additional services include support for caregivers and information about community resources. Guided Care® is currently available in six US states.

Who can benefit from Guided Care®?

  • Adults over 65 with disabilities
  • Frail older adults
  • People with multiple chronic conditions
  • People with behavioral and social needs
  • People with a serious illness

Hospital at Home®

If you have a serious illness and need to be admitted to the hospital, Hospital at Home® lets you receive the same type of care — but from the comfort of your own home. To qualify for this program, the doctors and nurses in an emergency department must decide your symptoms can be treated at home. Patients with a serious illness who remain cared for at home find it easier to complete everyday activities, like bathing, and caregivers feel less stressed. Hospital at Home® is currently available in ten states.

Who can benefit from Hospital at Home®?

  • Adults over 65 with disabilities
  • Frail older adults
  • People with multiple chronic conditions
  • People with behavioral and social needs
  • People with a serious illness

Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)

Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) provides care to older adults. This program lets you stay in your home, rather than moving to a nursing facility. Services include adult day care, outpatient laboratory testing, transportation, and family/caregiver support. The care team includes doctors, nurses, social workers, aides, and therapists. There are currently over 100 PACE programs in the United States. To be eligible for PACE, you must be 55 years or older. You must live in a PACE service area, and you must be certified by the state to need a nursing home level of care. People who use PACE services feel better about their health situation and have more of their needs met. For more information, or to locate a PACE program, visit the National PACE Association.

Who can benefit from PACE?

  • Adults over 65 with disabilities
  • Frail older adults
  • People with multiple chronic conditions
  • People with behavioral and social needs
  • People with a serious illness

The information on this page was made possible with the support of the Better Care Playbook.